2nd pediatric monkeypox case confirmed in CA: Here's what parents need to know

It the 5th reported child case in the country

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ByJ.R. Stone via KGO logo
Wednesday, August 3, 2022
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A second pediatric case of monkeypox has been confirmed in California, the fifth case in the country. Doctors' advice with what parents need to know.

SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- California's second pediatric case of monkeypox has been confirmed in Long Beach. It the fifth child case in the country.

There is growing concern among parents over this, but doctors we spoke with say kids are still low risk.

"COVID-19 is still a much bigger threat," says Stanford's Dr. Dean Winslow.

RELATED: Monkeypox: Everything you need to know about origin, infection, vaccines, and treatment

The infectious disease doctor who headed the COVID-19 Testing and Diagnostics Working Group in Washington D.C. during the height of the pandemic, is reassuring those concerned about monkeypox.

"Someone under the age of 18 and they were in close contact to somebody else who had monkeypox, and they are recovering and doing well," said the City of Long Beach's health officer Dr. Anissa Davis.

RELATED: Newsom declares state of emergency in CA for monkeypox, plans to amp up response

Dr. Davis says she can't say much about the pediatric case due to HIPAA concerns, but we spoke with her Tuesday about how you can catch monkeypox.

"This is a virus and it is passed by having sustained close contact, including intimate contact, so that can include cuddling and kissing, and feeding and bathing, a lot of things that children do with their family members," said Davis.

"Monkeypox is pretty much transmitted exclusively by close interpersonal contact, so skin-to-skin contact or mucus brain to mucus brain contact," said Dr. Winslow.

RELATED: Monkeypox and children: What to know about testing, symptoms, treatments and more

Data shows men who have sex with men have made up the majority of monkeypox cases nationwide, but now a small number of women and children have become infected.

Dr. Davis says that while sharing bedding or towels with someone who has monkeypox blisters could be a danger, trying on back to school clothes is low risk.

RELATED: SoCal child tests positive for monkeypox, believed to be 2nd in California

Dr. Winslow says parents should certainly not panic over news of this additional pediatric case.

"I have children and grandchildren and I'm not particularly concerned about them going back to school because of monkeypox. So again, I really would like to reassure viewers that their children are not particularly high risk from this disease," said Winslow.

While the monkeypox vaccine isn't regularly available for kids, it will be made available in certain situations where a young person may have come into contact with monkeypox.

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