Stanford women's soccer team honors former captain Katie Meyer, bringing awareness to mental health

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Sunday, October 16, 2022
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Friday marked a heartfelt and important night for Stanford's soccer community, still mourning the loss of the women's team goaltender, Katie Meyer.

STANFORD, Calif. (KGO) -- Friday marked a heartfelt and important night for Stanford's soccer community, still mourning the loss of the women's team goaltender, Katie Meyer, who died by suicide in February.

A sold out crowd flooded into Cagan Field for mental health awareness night as the Stanford Women's Soccer team faced UCLA.

"It's been difficult for sure. We miss her everyday, but we're playing this season and we're playing for her always," Andrea Kitahata, a sophomore with the team.

Kitahata donning a jersey with Katie's No.19 - in her memory - butterfly stickers were being handed out and being stuck onto everything from t-shirts to water bottles, signifying mental health awareness.

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"We just want to raise awareness for mental health and make sure that we are getting rid of the stigma and making sure everyone knows they are supported mentally and physically as athletes," said Kitahata.

Tara Campbell: "Why do you think it's important that we talk about mental health?"

Shelby Everhart plays soccer for team in Mill Valle: "Because it's good they understand others may be going through the same thing."

Everhart says Katie's death - is still being felt.

"I felt really sad that anyone could feel that way and that even when they got to be on Stanford's soccer team - team captain and all that," said Everhart.

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And for parents of next-generation players, like Wendy Verret - it's a meaningful night.

"I think it's really special that they're able to participate in this understand what it means to be able to reach out and say, 'hey, I need help' and to be educated about mental health awareness," said Verret.

"These girls are all like our sisters and we were all very close to Katie - and it's mental health awareness - there's nowhere else we'd be," said Carlo Agostinelli, men's team player, noting this season is dedicated to Katie.

"We think about her everyday and we just want to make her proud and make sure she's watching from above," said Agostinelli.

"Katie was amazing," said Kitahata. "I miss her so much and we're always playing for her and she's always in my heart."

TAKE ACTION: Local resources for those in crisis

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